Welcome to the APPG on the Great Lakes Region of Africa

Welcome to the website of The UK All-Party Parliamentary Group on the Great Lakes Region of Africa. This is a political website, but not party political: all members are passionate about the development of a region so vital to the future of Africa. Most people agree that the UK government is doing a good job on development, but people across the spectrum feel equally strongly about the desperate need for progress in the Great Lakes region. There’s a lot parliamentarians can do to keep pressing for more resources and more development assistance, but also for increased political goodwill towards implementation of key reforms. We try to do that by producing our own reports on the region, by convening working groups, by flagging up latest developments, by lobbying ministers.

The Great Lakes Region is the heart of Africa and potentially its driving force. But it has been wracked by years of conflict. In 1994, the Rwandan genocide shocked the international community, which did little effective to stop it. Since then, the region has seen wars ranging from the long-running conflict in Burundi to the devastating rebellion of the Lord's Resistance Army in northern Uganda. More than 5 million people have died as a result of the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the most devastating war since the Second World War, and one that few people in the rest of the world know of. Now, after almost 20 years of remarkable economic reconstruction in Rwanda, after diversely credible elections across the four countries, hope across the region for a brighter future still needs all the support it can get.

On this site you will find information and update on discussions and debates about the big issues facing the region.

Humanitarian Intervention

 

Kirsten Hagon on the far right.
Kirsten Hagon
This paper has been prepared by Kirsten Hagon, a Research Associate of the APPG. Kirsten is a Solicitor and graduate of the universities on Bond and Cambridge. She was Youth Representative of Australia to the UN General Assembly, and is a specialist in international law.

 

The paper provides an outline of international law governing the use of force as well as some of the legal and moral arguments for and against humanitarian intervention. It discusses options for humanitarian intervention in accordance with international law and suggests some possible parameters for action.

The paper was prepared for Members of Parliament and of the House of Lords who attended the APPG's meeting on intervention: A responsibility to protect? The future rules on intervention. It will also be of interest to anyone interested in learning more about the rules governing intervention and the main issues that frame the debate.

Files:
humanitarian_intervention_briefing_paper
Date 2012-07-26 Filesize 155.5 KB Download 349

Burundi

Rwanda

DRC

  • GOMA 23 July 2014 (IRIN) - International NGOs have rebuffed a recent offer by the UN Stabilization Mission (MONUSCO) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to use drones for humanitarian information gathering, saying this could represent a dangerous “blurring of the lines” between military and humanitarian actors in the conflict.

IRIN Great Lakes

  • BRAZZAVILLE 29 July 2014 (IRIN) - While the ceasefire signed in Brazzaville on 23 July by the two principal armed factions in the Central African Republic (CAR), the ex-Seleka and anti-Balaka, was widely greeted as a positive step forward, analysts are sceptical it can lead to lasting peace.

Uganda

  • MELBOURNE 29 July 2014 (IRIN) - Inaccessible health services for people with disabilities (PWD), combined with social stigma and violence, contribute to high HIV risk - a gap that must be filled if the disabled are not to remain disproportionately vulnerable to HIV/AIDS, say health experts and activists.

IRIN Africa

  • CONAKRY, 1 August 2014 (IRIN) - Medical teams struggling to curb Ebola in West Africa have been discouraging bush meat consumption, believed to have caused the outbreak, but some rural communities dependent on the meat for protein are determined to continue their traditional hunting practices.